Varicose Veins: Are You at Risk?

Varicose Veins: Are You at Risk?

Lumpy or twisted veins can affect people at any age but certain factors may increase the likelihood of having them. Some risk factors for developing varicose veins can be prevented, while some, you can’t do anything about – like genes.

Age is one of the risk factors for developing varicose veins. As you grow older, your veins become less elastic, causing the valves inside the veins to work less efficiently or stop working altogether.

Your genetic makeup is also one of the risk factors for developing varicose veins. If there is a history of a close family member having varicose veins, the likelihood that you will have them too is also increased.

Gender (women are more prone to have them) is also one of the risk factors for developing varicose veins. Researchers say female hormones may cause blood vessel walls to relax, making the valves more likely to leak.

Pregnancy is one of the risk factors for developing varicose veins. Pregnancy increases the amount of blood in your body that is needed to support a growing baby. This puts additional strain on your circulatory system. When you are expecting, your hormone levels also rise, causing the walls of your blood vessels to relax and the valves to close, impeding blood flow.

While pregnancy is one of the top risk factors for developing varicose veins, some women may find that their varicose veins have disappeared a few months after the baby’s birth.

A person’s lifestyle or occupation is also one of the risk factors for developing varicose veins. Those who lead sedentary lifestyle or have jobs that require them to stand or sit for long periods of time are more likely to have varicose veins. The reason for this is that the lack of movement keeps the blood from flowing normally.

Being overweight is also one of the risk factors for developing varicose veins. The excess pounds put extra pressure on your veins – they now have to work harder to keep the blood flowing back to your heart.

Some risk factors for developing varicose veins can be prevented or at least minimised. Try to shed off the excess pounds if you are overweight. If you have a sedentary lifestyle, try to squeeze in some exercise routines into your schedule. Putting your feet up once in a while also helps, especially if you are pregnant or have a job that requires long periods of standing.

The good news is that varicose veins can be removed. Ultrasound Guided Sclerotherapy and Endovenous Laser Ablation are two popular methods you can consider. Contact us if you have any questions about these procedures and we’ll be happy to help.